Saturday, October 24, 2009

New Interferometer Experiment

There is a new video on YouTube demonstrating the Michelson-Morley Interferometer experiment. The interferometer experiment replicates earlier designs, except the laser is rotated in the vertical plane in addition to the horizontal plane.


The Aether Physics Model quantifies the Aether as the container of matter. Therefore, where there is denser matter there is also greater Aether density. The greater the Aether density, the more time it will take for light to travel a given distance.

The Michelson-Morley experiment rotated in the horizontal plane. This meant the interferometer was rotating through an even Aether density. Dayton Miller later performed the same experiments on top of Mount Wilson and measured a definite (but small) Aether drift. For technical reasons, early interferometers could not be rotated in the vertical plane.

The mindless skeptics are already dismissing the experiment as a flexing of the metal table, which is absurd. As more people replicate the vertical rotating interferometer, the results will begin accumulating and the skeptics will be forever dismissed.

According to the Aether Physics Model, this experiment should also work on the Moon and even the space station. Further, the number of peaks in the interference pattern should decrease proportional to the mass of the body the experiment is performed near. Even further, the number of peaks should decrease with an increase in distance away from the center of mass.

I'm not yet sure of the experimenter's name, but I will be following up on this story. This will be one of the biggest breakthrough experiments of all time in fundamental physics.

2 comments:

siran said...

this is very interesting. have you continued research ?

why do you think there is an 360º symmetry and not 180º ?

David Thomson said...

Whether you look at only the symmetry of the horizontal plane, or decide to break it into quadrants by also splitting a perpendicular plane is a matter of choice in perception. The symmetry is what it is, regardless of how we choose to look at it.